And now, finally, I understand

“The Universe began with equal amounts of matter and antimatter after the Big Bang, and yet when we look out at today’s Universe, we find that, even on the largest scales, it’s made of at least99.999%+ matter andnotantimatter. The problem of how we went from a matter-antimatter-symmetric Universe to the matter-dominated one we have today is known as baryogenesis, and is one of the greatest unsolved problems in physics. Where are we on the quest to understand it as of April, 2014? A wonderful and comprehensive recap is here.”

Surely you’re joking

There is not a device invented that can measure the joy I have in watching Richard Feynman lecture. The man was not only a brilliant, Nobel Prize winning scientist, he was a great teacher and communicator of science as well. In this lecture by physicist Brian Cox—in this case speaking to school children for an event at Manchester University—I noticed that Cox played a one-minute clip (14:45 mark) from a Richard Feyman lecture given in the 1960s. Cox set up the clip by saying that it was one of the best definitions of science, or the scientific method, that he’d ever heard. Clear and simple and told in less than a minute.